All posts tagged: HPAC

Seeing the Unseen: An interview with Jeremy Bolen

How do we visualize what we cannot see; things that are scientifically proven to exist but are unable perceive with the naked human eye? Photographer, Jeremy Bolen uses his photographic process, a combination of science and art, to explore the unseen realm. In this interview we discussed his interest in the unseen, a bit of physics, some visual theory, and much more. Kate Korroch (KK): What inspired your interest in artistically documenting the unseen? Jeremy Bolen (JB): I guess it kind of began with an interest in exploring the apparatus. To create a site specific apparatus that could have a more intrinsic relationship, or collaboration, with the space or non- space. From the very beginning photography has been about capturing the unseen, about creating a different way of seeing, a new mode of observation and documentation. I have been rethinking the potential of the document and trying to create a more comprehensive, poignant document- a document with greater presence, a document incorporating the ontological. I spent some of my childhood living near Fermi-Lab, and when …

Reflections on the Critique with Kerry James Marshall: Everett Williams

On September 10, 2010 three artists participated in the Open Crit sessions at Hyde Park Art Center. As always, the session is mediated by photographer and HPAC board member Dawoud Bey, and led by an invited artist. This particular session had Kerry James Marshall as the guest critic. Chicago artist Everett Williams was one of the artists that participated in this session and as a follow up to the critique, I asked Williams some questions about his experience. Tempestt Hazel: It takes a lot of courage to present your work in an open forum such as the one you participated in at Hyde Park Art Center, let alone put it in front of a master artist such as Kerry James Marshall. What did you expect to get out of this experience, and why did you think that at this point in your career it was a good idea to do this? Everett Williams: I want my work to be seen with the best, so at this juncture of my career I need feed back from those …

Sixty in 60: Episode 1 – Hyde Park Arts Center

Sixty in 60. Hyde Park Arts Center from Andrew Roddewig on Vimeo. Clarion New Media, who is sponsoring the current Media Match Drive has produced the first in a continuing web-series entitled “Sixty in 60”. Sixty in 60 is a series focused on Organizations and Institutions that are incubators for the arts in Chicago. Every episode takes a look at a specific place to discover what makes them unique. Our goal is to highlight and promote the organizations and institutions that help the Chicago art community thrive and grow. We are only able to create specials like Sixty in 60 because of support from our community so please donate to the Media Match Campaign, so we can continue to bring art to the center. Episode 1: Hyde Park Arts Center. Located at 5020 S. Cornell Avenue; Hyde Park Art Center (HPAC) has a clear mission to stimulate and sustain the visual arts in Chicago. They have accomplished this mission for over 70 years through exhibitions, education and outreach. As one of the oldest alternative spaces …

Et Cetera: Soundsuits, The Dorchester Project, SSCAC, Intuit, and KJ Marshall Speaks Truth…again.

This past weekend there were intimate places in the city where amazing art conversations were being had–all of which you will see in more detail when the Sixty Inches From Center: Chicago Arts Archive and Collective Project is launched in October.  The first of those places was at the Hyde Park Art Center Open Crit with Kerry James Marshall and Dawoud Bey.  Now, much of what KJM said were things that fester in the back of my mind regularly, but how clearly and effectively he articulated the function of art made these ideas come crashing to the forefront of my thoughts.  Here are some of my favorite quotes from the Open Crit on Friday, Sept. 10. “The truth is the artwork that matters to me, and that matters to the Hyde Park Art Center, is work that’s in conversation with other artwork.  With other painters.  With the history of painting. That’s what really matters.  If its just to satisfy you, if it satisfies your friends, the people in your family, then by all means keep …