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Hyde Park Public Art (5 of 5)

Hyde Park Public Art (5 of 5)
The Spirit of Hyde Park, 2010. Hyde Park, Chicago, IL. (Photo credit: Zachary Johnson) In a recent phone conversation, Olivia Gude of the Chicago Public Art Group (CPAG) expressed her opinion that when a site-specific piece of art needs repair, Americans take on an “either/or” mentality. The piece will either be restored or destroyed. In older areas of the world, a third alternative has been commonplace... 

Hyde Park Public Art (4 of 5)

Hyde Park Public Art (4 of 5)
Hyde Park’s most coveted public art piece sits innocently among tall bushes at the north end of Nichols Park, near the intersection of Kimbark and 54th Street. With its smooth, bronze surface, it belies the notion that it has suffered over ten thousand dollars worth of damages due to theft. After all, who would want to steal a five foot tall bronze egg? Who even could? The Bird of Peace (also referred... 

Hyde Park Public Art (3 of 5)

Hyde Park Public Art (3 of 5)
Chicago Public Art Group, Reaching Back, Moving Forward, Lest We Forget the Song of 47th Street, 2011. Mosaic, Hyde Park, Chicago, IL. (photo credit: Zachary Johnson) Hyde Park’s two newest public art pieces peer at each other from underneath the underpass at 47th and Lake Park Boulevard. Though their style and media differ, they both speak to the experience of living in Hyde Park and Kenwood. The... 

Hyde Park Public Art (2 of 5)

Hyde Park Public Art (2 of 5)
Olivia Gude, Where are you coming from...where are you going, 1992. Hyde Park, Chicago, IL. (Photo Credit: Zachary Johnson) “Where are you coming from?” “Where are you going?” In 1991, Olivia Gude, an avid muralist, stood outside the 56th Street Metra station with a tape recorder asking these questions to people who passed by. As one might think, she came up with a wide variety of answers.... 

Hyde Park Public Art (1 of 5)

Hyde Park Public Art (1 of 5)
In the earlier decades of the twentieth century, Lorado Taft may have been Chicago’s most famous artist. His was a name I’d never heard before, but after a little research I realized I’d seen his sculptures all over town. I first saw his “Fountain of The Great Lakes” outside the Art Institute in high school and discovered his two Graceland Cemetery sculptures, one a crusader and another... 
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