All posts tagged: Laura Berger

Take Five: Memorable Art of 2010

As Sixty Inches From Center continues to grow and explore all facets of visual art in Chicago, we asked some of our contributors to reflect back on this past year and discuss the most memorable encounters of 2010. Atomic Sketch Author: Meggie Hankel My Best Of 2010 choice is something I didn’t discover until late in the year: the live art- making event known as Atomic Sketch. What exactly is Atomic Sketch? Once a month, local artists gather at the evilOlive in Wicker Park and produce series of original work throughout the night. This work is tacked on a display board and then sold at extremely affordable prices (on average, $5-15 per piece). Onlookers can grab a drink at the bar and socialize with fellow art lovers or with the artists themselves. Though a panel of artists is typically selected for each event, anyone is welcome to bring their own supplies and drop in and create work, space permitting. Atomic Sketch does not collect commission, and all proceeds go directly to the artists. More interactive …

Kicking Off the DIY Craft Season

With all of the commotion surrounding the Renegade Craft Fair this past weekend, it can be easy to forget that Chicago’s second biggest indie craft show was just two weeks ago. November twentieth was the eighth year for the DIYTrunk Show, a fair put annually by the Chicago Craft Mafia. While similar to the Renegade Craft Fair (both events are held at the  Pulaski Field House), the trunk show is somewhat smaller in scale, takes place on one day only, and focuses more on local crafters. The Chicago Craft Mafia organizes the show in order to support the Chicago crafting community. Their passion for craft is laid out in their Craftifesto, which states that craft is powerful, political, personal, and possible At the trunk show I interviewed three very different participants. The first, Paul Snagel, proves that craft is powerful, that is, that the things we want and need can be bought from craftsmen in our own community. Paul rescues vintage objects from obscurity and transforms them into lamps. His interview can be found here. The second, Laura Berger, proves that craft is personal.  Laura shares her charming, quirky …

Lakeview East First Fridays

The city’s newest art walk is happening in a neighborhood most Chicagoans would assume has no art scene to speak of. Still, it seems enough people were aware of Lakeview East’s First Fridays to create healthy crowds in each of its four locations. Launched last month as a collaboration between Inkling, a local art and craft gift shop, and Loose Leaf, a nearby café, the walk also includes Clothes Optional, a vintage clothing and home goods store, and Spare Parts, a boutique and gift shop. Lester Palmiano and Phillip Jolliffe at Loose Leaf had been holding monthly art shows regularly for two and a half years. It wasn’t until last month, however, that Lester and Stephanie Keller of Inkling decided to put a walk together. Stephanie reported that the other two locations were “more than receptive” when asked if they wanted to join in. Together, these four businesses comprise Chicago’s only art walk put on solely by non-gallery spaces. Stephanie said she was interested in using her store’s wall space to bring more awareness to local artists. …

Catching Up with Laura Berger at the DIY Trunk Show

During the recent DIY Trunk Show I caught up with three very different participants (the other interviews can be found here and here) and asked them a few questions. One such participant was Laura Berger, an artist who blurs the lines between the art and craft worlds. How long have you been working in your current style and media? How did you begin creating this sort of art? I’ve been painting and drawing my entire life. In college & afterward, I worked as a scenic artist where I painted huge murals for businesses & backdrops for theatre productions. I started working smaller and focusing on my own work in 2007. My father had just passed away and I was really needing a fairly constant distraction that could hold my attention & make my thoughts lighter. I think that’s where the kind of fantastical characters and positive sentiments arose from…basically out of a desire to think about more pleasant things and feel better. What is the inspiration behind your work? I’m inspired a lot by Japanese …