All posts tagged: SIFC CHicago

Sixty on Sixty: An Interview with Danielle Jackson

Since she started with Sixty, Danielle Jackson has shown undeniable dedication to the art and artists that she chooses to write about.  In her short time with us she has brought a refreshing and often playful edge to the archive through her conversations with artists like David Leggett, Michael Rea, Willy Chyr, Claire Ashley, Dutes Miller & Stan Shellabarger and Adelheid Mers. In the final days leading up to her departure to San Francisco to begin graduate school at California College of the Arts, Danielle and I sat down for brunch and revisited some of the most memorable moments of her interviews, the themes that will anchor her curatorial practice and her imagined future as the potential James Bond of the art world. TH: When did you realize that art was something you wanted to do as a career? DJ: I think I always knew it. But I originally started off in architecture. I got really frustrated with that, I felt really restricted because you’re designing for someone else. You’re not really doing what you …

BIFORA | Carlo LoCascio Exhibition at Blanc Gallery

“Living isn’t space or time; living is only many moments, the sum of which is also but a moment.” – Carlo LoCascio   When you step inside of Blanc Gallery you quickly realize just that–it’s a blanc gallery. As you probably know or deduced, Blanc means ‘white’ in French and describes the gallery from floor to ceiling. It is the glowing definition of a white cube. This just might be to the benefit of their most recent exhibition, Bifora: Portrait of a Moment with the work of Italian-born, now Chicago-based artist, Carlo LoCascio. The blank canvas that the space provides mimics what happens on LoCascio’s canvases–guiding the viewer’s eye to a specific place within a given space. The loose laying of charcoal, paint and fabric, which in some cases almost swallows the more tightly rendered subject studies, work together to keep your eye moving until it is given a moment to rest on a carefully-crafted face, hand or object. LoCascio’s work does exactly what he sets out for it to do. It asks that as you …

The Art of Cultural Fusion: A Conversation with Gitte Bog

The art world is a small world. As we move through it, it tends to shrink more and more. This was made clear when I found myself in conversation with Danish artist Gitte Bog. She was in town for two days completing two ongoing projects with parts that started in Chicago more than a year ago. Curious about her request for a sign that read, “I am looking for participants for two art projects relating to Chicago”, and her request for permission to sit at a table in the lobby of the Chicago Cultural Center, I asked her about her projects. While she described the one which was done for last year’s Vers10n Fest at the Zhou B Art Center, I realized that I had participated in it. My wrapper with its shot-in-the-dark translation of a Danish word into English was floating in the sea of colorful wrappers that she had collected over the years. Centered around language, taste and things lost in translation, the candies project is a perfect illustration of what is at …

Duncan Mackenzie at the 2010 CAA Conference

Duncan Mackenzie, wears many hats. Along with being a professor of fine art at Columbia College Chicago, he is a practicing artist and also collaborates on a weekly podcast and blog called Bad At Sports (how great is that title for an art blog/podcast?!). This collaborative project offers informative, revealing and incredibly entertaining reviews and interviews with everyone in the arts–from curators to individual artists to art publishers to arts advocates, and everyone in between. Once I discovered this blog, it quickly become a regular on my iPod. In addition to this, somwhere between all these things, Mackenzie works on various other collaborative projects. This brief interview gives you a snapshot of his world which includes national developing projects and words of wisdom, with a touch of that Duncan Mackenzie humor. Take five minutes for these ten questions–you’ll be happy you did! 1. Briefly tell me about yourself. What is your current role in the arts and how did you get there? Artist, Journalist, Educator, “Conversation-ist,” and person of questionable virtue and foolish commitment. 2. Is …

Art Here Art Now

The great thing about attending events with professional  photographer friends is that they steal your camera and start snapping great pictures.  Jabari Zuberi, an artist who has a solo show at UIC in December, acted as my personal photographer for the evening.  Last night for the Kick-off of Chicago Artists Month, Jabari and I met in Hyde Park for Art Here Art Now, a show coordinated by the wonderful Dara Epison in association with the University of Chicago.  The show featured an open-storefront studio where artists Cydney Lewis, Michelle Weber, and Marty Burns will be working alongside installations by Andre Callot, Danielle Paz and Peter Zeigler.  The studio artists were working each Saturday in October, with doors open for the public to come and take a peek into the creative process.  I spoke with Cydney for a brief moment about working in a public studio such as this one, and she spoke briefly about how different it will be to work in such an open space when people can come in to have a conversation and ask …

Hyde Park Op Shop 3: Where PBR meets S.Pellegrino…

If you know EJ Hill then you’ve probably gotten food for your mind, body and intellectual soul from him.  You’ve probably entered a very inviting environment.  You are probably an amateur artist without even knowing it–just by being who you are and doing what you do, and participating when invited. For “Us”, the closing event for Op Shop, EJ invited the public to participate in a potluck in Hyde Park.  While I’ve been to the Op Shop on the corner of Lake Park and 53rd at an abandoned, former Hollywood Video, this particular Op Shop brought up old memories of good music and my days as a High Fidelity-esque record store snob.  See, this particular location was once Dr. Wax–the place that people in-the-know went to purchase tickets to the best shows and get the scoop on new music from the guru of all that’s good, Duane Powell.  It was Dr. Wax that introduced me to Jaspects, Bilal Salaam and 4Hero.  It was where I bought my Foreign Exchange tickets.  (Insert Deep Sigh Here). I …