All posts tagged: Roman Susan Gallery

Of working with grafting and waiting for rejection, knowing one of them will eventually hold

The following is a response to the show autoretrato o piel vieja y lo que sobra de una manda cumplida (self-portrait or old skin and remnants of a prayer answered) by Juan Molina Hernández, up at Roman Susan through August 3, 2019. The stem, the leaf, the container, the echo; a body, a limb, a paper, a song. Juan Molina Hernández’s photographs repeat themselves, making doubles and triples, ripples expanding outwards, themselves like leaves on a stem. Small, a little larger, a little larger. This is a place of both grafting and shedding, of provisioning and moulting, of segmentation as a cut that pushes space for new shoots. Rhythmically hung photographs span two walls that meet, making a larger collaged composition, a segmented backdrop to a stage of potted plants – dozens of potted plants – lining a wall of huge windows that meet the ground. The plants here are chosen from a distant index, reflecting back from the plants in the photographs: from Molina Hernández’s grandmother’s garden in Guanajuato. A tethering of source, seed, …

Envisioning an Abolitionist Future

What would the world be like if we eliminated prisons, surveillance, and policing? What types of alternative methods can we seek to pursue justice? What systems can we set in place to encourage people to come clean about their wrongdoings? These questions are at the center of the prison industrial complex (PIC) abolition movement, which aims to dismantle violent systems founded on oppression and inequality, including imprisonment, surveillance, and policing. These questions are also ever-relevant in Chicago, a city with a long history of racist police violence. Do Not Resist? 100 Years of Chicago Police Violence, a recent community-based, artist-led multi-site exhibition that took place across Chicago at the Hairpin Arts Center, Roman Susan Gallery, Uri-Eichen Gallery, and Art In These Times, presented artworks that dealt with Chicago’s history of police violence. The artworks focused on specific victims and incidents of police violence, shifting the dialogue to question the PIC more universally. The final event of the exhibition-related programming, “The Aesthetics of Abolition in the 21st Century,” brought together Mariame Kaba and Sarah Ross to discuss the …