All posts tagged: Hebru Brantley

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Snapshot: Tianna Bracey

Snapshot is a Sixty column that takes a quick look at art history as it happens in Chicago. We send artists and organizers a list of short and sweet questions to tell us about what they are doing right at this moment. For the newest installment, we sent our questions to painter, Tianna Bracey, whose work can be seen at the Zhou B Art Center as part of the exhibition, Black Love Matters, through November 9th. Sixty Inches From Center: How would you describe your work? Tianna Bracey: My work explores the subtleties of the painterly and figurative form. It is intended as recognizable snapshots of the female experience, ranging from the pleasurable to the mundane. I employ body language, gesture, movement and expression as narrative tools. Through every piece I aim to celebrate the power and vulnerability of women through portraiture. SIFC: What do you find most challenging about working as an artist? TB: Knowing the difference between when to let go and when to push through is by far my biggest challenge. I have no problem painting over …

The Silver Room That’s Gold: An Interview with Eric Williams, Pt. 2

This is the second part of an interview with The Silver Room owner Eric Williams, just in time for the 9th Annual Sound System Block Party. Did you catch part one? If not, check out ‘The Silver Room That’s Gold: An Interview with Eric Williams, Pt. 1’. Tempestt Hazel: What I think is so great about The Silver Room is that it allows for such diverse programming to happen in it. Having readings, exhibitions, music, clothing, etc. around those themes seems natural. Eric Williams: It is. And it’s not all me. A lot of times it comes from other people who understand that the space is available for a different kind of voice to be spoken. If they get what the space is they approach me [with an idea] and I say, “Yea, let’s do it.” That way, I’m not always depending on myself to come up with what’s next. TH: Roughly how many shows have you had here? EW: Maybe 20? Hebru Brantley, Krista Franklin and Tyrue ‘Slang’ Jones [have each] had a show …

The Silver Room That’s Gold: An Interview with Eric Williams, Pt. 1

Maintaining a successful art space is no easy task. Those of us who are regulars within the Chicago arts circuit have seen a fair share of galleries, alternative spaces and performance venues come and go. When you find one that stands the test of time it most likely means they’re onto something. After thirteen years of providing a platform and outlet for many up-and-coming or local superstar artists, musicians and artisans–and even the general public through Grown Folks Stories–it’s safe to say that Eric Williams, the owner of The Silver Room, has struck gold (or silver).  He has done this through embracing versatility and flexibility, therefore allowing his business and even his own career path to transform and grow when necessary. In light of the 9th Annual Sound System Block Party happening this Saturday, July 16th, I sat down with Eric to get the full story of how he went from stock broker turned successful street peddler, to the owner of a place that has given new meaning to the term multi-functional. (Note: This is …

The Chicago Street Art Show: Artists Goons & Don’t Fret

During the week of installation for The Chicago Street Art Show at The Chicago Urban Art Society I had the opportunity to speak with several participating artists including Don’t Fret and Goons. The closing reception for the show will take place this Friday, June 3rd.  If you are unable to make it to the reception, keep posted for future coverage including a video reflection consisting of interviews and footage from the show. Additionally featured this week is an interview with Joseph J. Depre, curator of The Chicago Street Art Show. Chicago Street Artist: Don’t Fret Nicolette Caldwell: What is your history with street art? Don’t Fret: I’ve been making art for as long as I can remember. I first got involved with graffiti in seventh grade. All the kids in my seventh grade class chose tag names from South Park characters and I was Pip. NC: That is really clever. So it started from when you were younger? DF: Yeah, I grew up in the city and I remember graffiti from a very young age. …

In The Studio with Hebru Brantley

On March 18th, Hebru Brantley will have his first solo show at Zhou B Gallery. The show is entitled Afro-Futurism: Impossible View. As Hebru puts his show together, SIFC has been invited into his studio to document his process and explore the origins of his work through a five-part video series.
In this first video we ask Hebru to describe his influences and what he hopes his audiences will take from his show.

On Chicago Street Art: Community

Part I: Chicago street artist Blutt talks about his work and experiences living as a street artist in Chicago. Blutt: The name I use for my artwork is Blutt. I live in Chicago and grew up around the Midwest and just kind of based on the stuff I grew up with like the music and skateboarding and graffiti and comic books. I do mostly nowadays stuff that is studio work paintings and drawings but I also have stickers and posters that I put up on the street. That stuff is mostly prints and reproductions that are pretty cheap and I can put them out there when I am out and about doing whatever. It seems to work pretty well when I can quickly throw stuff up and people see it and recognize it and tend to like it for the most part. Sometimes a few people tear it down but I like that too. When did you decide to start creating street art? Blutt: I kind of made a concerted effort to do that probably …

The Elephant Room, Inc.

The Elephant Room, Inc. is a gallery in the South Loop that exhibits work by some of the most cutting-edge artists in the city.  The following shows the most recent exhibitions “Forget about the Future” featuring the work of Cydney Lewis and “Common Ground” featuring the work of Hebru Brantley, Sam Kirk and Hugo Style.  I also sat down with gallery owner Kimberly Atwood to hear more about the artists and where the gallery got its name. Elephant Room, Inc. from Tempestt Hazel on Vimeo. Music by Tall Black Guy Productions.

Unleash the lease. Torluemke and Soto

Joshua Ginsberg owner and founder of Chicago Art Leasing LLC discussed with me why he thinks leasing art is a great way to support artists aside from selling artwork outright, “it takes the hassle out of the art buying process because the 300+ artists on our roster gives an eclectic mix of art that you won’t always find in most commercial galleries and we offer a varied price range depending on the clients needs ,” says Ginsberg. Artwork by Josh Garrett, Shane Swank, Beatriz Ledezma, and Jori Foreman are only four examples of the 300+ artists on Chicago Art Leasing’s roster. Read the entire interview transcribed when the SIFC Archive launches on October 30th, 2010. Tom Torluemke brings a whole new meaning to “Exhibition”, really. Check out the amazingly prolific showcase of Torluemke’s work entitled, “The Exhibitionist” at the Co-Prosperity Sphere. Stay tuned for the audio excerpt of our discussion when we fully launch in October. The opening of Homily at the ebersmoore space not only features solo work by Edra Soto but you will also find work by Carmen …

The Kids Might Stand A Chance…

On Friday I made my way out to KVG Gallery, a spot run by the magnificent Anna Kunz who will be going off to New York very soon for a year-long residency.  The exhibition, titled Indestructible Youth, was co-curated by brilliant artist and painter, and now curator, Erol Scott Harris II.  The essay that went with the exhibition was written by writer, art historian and educator Debra Riley Parr and offered me a moment in the middle of the opening activity to reflect on my own relationship with the concept of indestructible youth.  After quoting lyrics from Neil Young, Parr states: “Forever young is not attractive.  Everyone needs to pack up and leave Sugar Mountain sooner or later.  And yet, the yearning to live in that space lingers.  Indeed, the appeal of youth and youth cultures holds strong in a young culture like that of the US where being young is cool, powerful, sexy and dangerous.  The Italian Futurists of the early 20th century thought similarly about the attractions of being young, and they clearly …