Author: Kate Korroch

Cuddled Apples and Coital Rods: An Interview with Bobby Doherty

A twig resting precariously on a wrench propped against a bubble gum pink painted background. Two apples, one faded green and one bright red, nestled in a bright red and white stripe cloth. A man, with perfectly smooth and dark skin sits erect and upright, facing away from the camera, his back covered with neatly arranged baby-pink bows. Objects positioned (or mistakenly happened) into anthropomorphic affairs: cuddled apples, coital rods. In his photographs, Bobby Doherty simply states, Maybe Everything is About Love. Kate Korroch: In your artist statement you explain, “that  [the] moment when the photograph is taken is the only thing that really matters to [you].” That is a beautiful and poignant line that is especially interesting when considering the staged look of your photographs in your series Maybe Everything is About Love. Can you tell me a bit about your process and the balance between spontaneity and composition? Bobby Doherty: It’s all from the same place. Some things are set up, some things aren’t. Most of the stuff I try to put together …

Seeing the Unseen: An interview with Jeremy Bolen

How do we visualize what we cannot see; things that are scientifically proven to exist but are unable perceive with the naked human eye? Photographer, Jeremy Bolen uses his photographic process, a combination of science and art, to explore the unseen realm. In this interview we discussed his interest in the unseen, a bit of physics, some visual theory, and much more. Kate Korroch (KK): What inspired your interest in artistically documenting the unseen? Jeremy Bolen (JB): I guess it kind of began with an interest in exploring the apparatus. To create a site specific apparatus that could have a more intrinsic relationship, or collaboration, with the space or non- space. From the very beginning photography has been about capturing the unseen, about creating a different way of seeing, a new mode of observation and documentation. I have been rethinking the potential of the document and trying to create a more comprehensive, poignant document- a document with greater presence, a document incorporating the ontological. I spent some of my childhood living near Fermi-Lab, and when …

Shooting the Periphery: An all-nighter with Zane Davis

“Following the north branch from the edge of Skokie to the heart of downtown you see the complete transformation from a creek in a forest, to a drain for the city.” —Zane Davis on the Chicago River A dark and sober night makes me pay attention. Shadows hide the distracting details of daily life; the bits of light that are present guide my eyes. I meditate on the details as something seemingly ordinary transforms to something noteworthy. From industrial parks to deer sprinkled mid-western forests, the bridges dispersed along the Chicago River highlight the heterogeneous landscape of the great city. Zane Davis’s series Towards Wolf Point, gives the viewer a chance to see this. He shoots at night and invited me to go along for one of his “all-nighter” photo adventures. The plan for the evening was to jump into the rented convertible, Rosa, and shoot the Chicago River from the bridges on the city’s periphery. Around 10:00 P.M. we started at West 35th  Street and Ashland, the southernmost bridge crossing the Chicago River. Each …

And Then She’s Like/And He Goes—And I Asked: An Interview with Chris Campe

And The She’s Like/And He Goes, an exhibition at A+D Gallery,that juxtaposes text-based and sound-based art to expose the rich layers of the media and content. Chris Campe, artist and curator of the exhibition, recently returned to Germany after completing her Master of Art in Visual and Critical Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. In this interview Campe sheds light on curating from abroad, the unique combination of artworks, German compound nouns, and the relationship of letterforms, text and sound in art. Kate Korroch: First and foremost congratulations on the exhibition! Can you tell me a bit about your process in selecting the artists and their specific works? Chris Campe: Thanks! I am very excited about the show – all the more because I moved back to Hamburg before it opened and I haven’t actually seen it yet! The initial selection of the visual artists came about quite naturally – they are all my friends. I love their work and because we all use hand-rendered text in our images I felt …